Women in Film & Diversity in Entertainment!

0

Roman Media Inc.

 

Heads up, Everyone! Hollywood is going to be giving a shout out to Women in Film on February 21, 2017.

This isn’t a “horror” exclusive event, rather it’s about acknowledging all the women who put their blood, sweat, and tears into the entertainment industry.

“We are championing Women in Film and Diversity in Entertainment. Our goal is to celebrate with the Los Angeles Genre Film community and create an environment where filmmakers, producers, decision makers, and actors can network, discover new opportunities to grow, and continue to make more meaningful films,” says Michelle Romano, actress, producer and CEO of Roman Media Inc..

This sounds like it’s going to be an awesome party. There’s going to be the red carpet, award show, and then the fashion show. Some of the sponsors include The Independent Cinema Foundation, Breezeway Productions, and ChicArt Public Relations.

Advertisements

“XX” Showcases All Female Horror Anthology

1

Holy Shit, Dudes! Are you ready to sink your teeth into an all female horror anthology film? I know I am!

From what I’ve been hearing, “XX” is a horror anthology film with four stories in it that were written and directed by some badass women. We have Annie Clark directing THE BIRTHDAY PARTY, Karyn Kusama directing HER ONLY LIVING SON, Roxanne Benjamin directing DON’T FALL, Jovanka Vuckovic directing THE BOX, and Sofia Carrillo ties it all together.

If you haven’t checked out the work they’ve been previously involved with you really should. I recognize Kusama from the film THE INVITATION. I will be writing a review for that one later. Just know that I really liked it and it’s on Netflix so check it out.

Anyway, I’m excited to see what these ladies have for us. Remember “XX” will be available February 17 on VOD and in select cities. Check it out and let me know what you think!

ANYONE ELSE CURIOUS ABOUT “THE BOX”?

giphy4

Calling Women Of Horror!!

0

It’s probably a little early to announce this but it’s time for the Women in Horror Film Festival!

That’s right! This festival is all about the ladies and their dedication to the horror genre. This will be an awesome film festival where artists from every avenue like make-up, directing, writing, producing, acting, and music can come together and show that they can keep up with the best of them.

So if you have a film or a screenplay that you want to share with the world, please go to the website HERE and follow the instructions. The submissions to the festival are open! Don’t waste an opportunity to show us what you got.

There will also be awards given out which include Best Horror Documentary, Best International Horror Film, Best LGBTQ Horror Film, and many more!

I’d rather you all check out the website HERE and get your questions answered or go to their Twitter HERE.

I’ll write about this again as we get closer to the festival’s date in September.

How many of you are planning on going? Any of you going to take the plunge and submit your work? Let me know what you think!

Women In Horror 2016!

0

Yes indeed! It’s Women in Horror Month. The wonderful time where we get to appreciate women who contribute to the horror genre.

Last night in London, Jonathon Hughes(British gamer and Horror Enthusiast) put on a special night of  showcasing horror films made by women from across the globe. This special even was called “United In Blood”. Hughes has said,

“It has always been an ambition of mine to promote independent films. I have also wanted to make ‘Women in Horror Month’ truly relevant here in the UK, so what better way to do so than to host a night in honour of the ‘Femmes Fatales’ of the independent horror scene.” 

God bless you, Sir! Anyway, Damsel Cannibal and myself were unable to attend this shindig, but we were able to get our hands on a short film directed by Patricia Chica titled “Serpent’s Lullaby”.

This is a beautiful film about loneliness, loss, and love. One thing I do enjoy about horror is that it can make you feel more that just terror or gross you out.

“Serpent’s Lullaby” is about a mysterious and wealthy woman and how she may know the reason for the disappearances of infants in a small town. Through her eyes we see her loneliness and sorrow as she covets over what other women have and what she will never obtain.

I hope you have a chance to catch up on Women In Horror now matter the format. Also keep your eyes out for the following films also featured at “United In Blood”!

Kitty Kitty by Blair Bathory An Independent Short Horror film that utilises all practical effects and a creature suit to share the horrific fate of a girl who lies to get what and who she wants.

Vintage Blood by Abigail Blackmore. At a quirky vintage shop, owner Izzy must cope with a curse that threatens her boyfriend’s life.

The Paper Round by Katie Bonham. A psychological short horror that uncovers the gruesome reality behind a continuous cycle of events.

She by Chelsey Burdon. SHE follows a young couple who share a loveless and dispassionate relationship; no communication, affection or indication of attachment.

Seize The Night by Emma Dark. Renegade vampire assassin Eva has escaped from a secret bio-research compound. Hell bent on revenge she learns a terrible secret that may force her to unite with the devil she knows in order to defeat the greatest of all evils.

INK by Andy Stewart. A man takes the path of least resistance (and cost) in an attempt to turn his body into a work of art.

El Gigante by Gigi Saul Guerrero. A sadistic family captures a Mexican man who was crossing the Mexico/US border illegally.

Gimp by Kate Shenton. Black comedy about a gimp, a dominatrix and an alarm clock.

Call Girl by Jill Sixx Gevargizian. In one man’s attempt to exploit his date night via video-chat, he ends up sharing something far more disturbing. Some people like to watch. Do you?

Dys by Maude Michaud A strange disease is plaguing the city. Hoping to escape contamination, Eva and Sam, an estranged married couple, are forced to barricade themselves in their apartment despite the palpable tension between them. Now forced into isolation in their small living space, they struggle with their own frailty in a world that can only offer the worst horrors imaginable.

Spook Lights: Southern Gothic Horror

0

Southern gothic horror is uniquely (under-appreciated!) American literature, and too often written by white men. Imagine my surprise when stumbling across Eden Royce’s self-published anthology collection on GoodReads. A  black horror author with roots in Hoodoo/Conjure. Yasssss. I downloaded her book without hesitation and read it while listening to my old delta blues records. The proper way to enjoy a southern gothic is on a porch swing while the sweet, idle songs from grasshoppers rise up from the brush. Unfortunately, congested, downtown Chicago makes that impossible. So listening to Skip James was the next best thang, y’all. I’m also a little homesick and I miss my Gulf side of Texas. Reading “Spook Lights” was the perfect escapism for this reluctant city gal.

Connect with the author on

@edenroyce on Twitter  or her website, edenroyce.com, or blog

Or better, just buy her book on Amazon  or Lulu

There are 12 short stories in all, but my three favorites were “Doc Buzzard’s Coffin,” “Hag Ride,” and “The Choking Kind.” Royce’s melodic writing is full of texture, atmosphere, and characters that invoke the South. I felt the swelter and stale, human sweat rise through each word. Descriptive language meets Black folklore to create a leisurely atmosphere. Think ghost stories told around the campfire. Think of the fairytales your grandmother read to you when you were a child. Reading Spook Lights is more of an experience best enjoyed when not rushed. The horror element is subtle, often ironic, and I found myself able to predict most of the stories’ conclusions, however, the author’s charm and folksy delivery kept me squirming in my seat until the end of them. Most of the short stories are cautionary tales, where the main character often does something stupid, only to be punished or chastised by a vengeful spirit or magical spell later. There’s Hoodoo, Voodoo, murders driven by passion, and quests for revenge.

There’s also strong thread of female (often motherly) wisdom and jilted love in this collection. I appreciated the strong female protagonists of color. The women were often victims of their own making, but learned along the way how to find themselves. You don’t have to be from the south, Black, or a woman to understand the overall concept of this book, which I love. The author does a lovely job blending mythology for contemporary tastes. This is a book to kick back with and savor, bit by bit. It’s down-to-earth, like crackling bacon grease in a hot pan or like cold, tap water from the kitchen sink. Let the stories do the heavy lifting for you–Royce’s subtlety is masterful.

I enjoyed Spook Lights for its storytelling, not necessarily for innovation, horror, or plots. That said, I’m giving this anthology collection a solid 5/5. I heartily recommend Spook Lights to those looking for an enjoyable read rich with Southern atmosphere and non-traditional folktales told from Native American, Black, and a Caribbean perspective. Eden Royce’s ability to entertain is a dream. I will be reading more of her work.

 

Jonathan Strage & Mr. Norrell

0

Catch Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell on Saturdays on BBC!

I am not an anglophile like Damsel Bruja. I find most popular British television marketed to American audiences incomprehensible, but Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell is refreshing, compelling, and dare I say, exciting? The first two episodes aired on BBCAmerica so you can catch up if you start now. I think English viewers are already on episode six?

Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell is an alternate historical story set during the Napoleonic Wars. The main characters, Jonathan and Norrell are two very different magicians destined to make magic respectable in England again. No longer the stuff of parlor tricks, magic can be applied to aid the war effort. Norrell is nervous, introverted, and socially awkward where Jonathan is a likable idiot whose failed attempts to win over his lady friend are used for comic relief. I’ve never seen anything like this! (No, it’s nothing like Harry Potter–thank god) There’s necromancy, supernatural deities, prophecies, and an unusual wit about the whole thing.

Not a fan of BBC? That’s OK. Apparently Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell is based on the bestselling book of the same title by British fantasy/specfic author, Susanna Clark. I’ve only watched the first episode, but my fondness for female sf/f/h/specfic authors will probably lead me to the library this week. Fun fact: it took Susaana Clark TEN YEARS to finish the novel and several failed attempts to get it published. She was told her book was “unmarketable.” Ha. Showed them, right? I love author success stories like these and I can’t wait to read the book.

It’s rare I come across a series with original, refreshing material, but THIS is it. And I’m excited to sink my teeth into Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell. Set your DVRs, run to your library and watch/read with me. Trailer below.

RIP Horror International Film Festival Adds a New Category

0

Now hear this! Now hear this!

We all know that February is Women in Horror Month but the RIP International Film Festival decided that maybe more should be done for the ladies in horror. So What brilliant idea have they come up with? The RIP International Film Festival is adding a new category to their lists. Ready? It is the Best Female Filmmaker Award!

Festival Founder, L.J. Rivera says,

“I want to contribute to the empowerment of women working in the business for the advancement of the horror genre. Award winning female filmmakers like Maria Olsen, Adriana Polito, Patricia Chica, and Jessica Cameron are making the difference. We want to support the achievements of outstanding filmmakers like these who are creating some of the most exciting and innovative work in the genre, as well as promote undiscovered talent waiting to explode onto the scene,”.

Well I’m super excited! It may not seem like much, but this is a great start to show that The Business is taking women seriously.

Social Media:

https://twitter.com/RIPHorrorFest

https://www.facebook.com/RipHorrorFilmFestival?ref=hl

http://riphorrorfilmfest.com/

Articles:

http://anythinghorror.com/2015/03/07/over-at-rip-women-in-horror-month-lasts-all-year-long/

Death Ray Potato Bake

0

Death Ray Potato Bake by Teresa Hawk (image source: https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1408548104l/23002800.jpg)

I only know (knew?) Teresa Hawk from Twitter. She used to tweet all the time but I haven’t seen her around in months. I would provide her handle but her account is no longer active. For shame. Her tweets were hilarious. Anyway.

I happened to receive “Death Ray Potato Bake” for free on Amazon Kindle months ago but forgot about the thing until I saw it in my library today. It was St. Patrick’s Day–Irish people and potatoes are stereotyped together, so what the hell, I thought. Might as well be festive. And I read it.

So many authors try (and miss the mark) to be both funny and suspenseful, but Teresa Hark succeeds on both counts. What an entertaining read! Who doesn’t fantasize about killing their mother? With a potato?

Bizarre, smartly-written, and creative. I would recommend this little short for people who take a dash of dark comedy with their horror. Her writing style is dry, mocking, and effortlessly funny without calling attention to itself. I smiled the whole way through. Solid five stars. I know Teresa Hawk has written other short stories and so I will be definitely read more as soon as I am able.

Check out her books Goodreads.

Happy reading!

Give it Up for the Women in Horror!

0

Despite all the efforts women made to choose their careers, that damn glass ceiling keeps getting in the way. This month is to recognize women of the horror genre. Be it directors, writers, actors, playwrights, etc they deserve their time in the spotlight. Which brings me to Women in Horror Month.

Damsel Cannibal and I stumbled on this while goofing around on twitter and discussing how women aren’t getting the proper recognition within the industry. It’s infuriating. Trust me I can get on my soap box and talk about how Hollywood holds women back or how the literary industry can’t bare the thought of a strong heroine. But I’m not going to do that. I’d rather focus on what we, as artists or consumers, can do to change this way of thinking.

So take a chance to to browse the website womeninhorrormonth.com and make a donation. The purpose of the site is to give exposure and other opportunities for women within the Horror community. You can also follow this site on Twitter or Facebook which I will provide at the bottom. Again, take a moment, educate yourself, and make a difference.

Social Media:

https://www.facebook.com/WomenInHorrorMonth

https://www.twitter.com/WiHMonth

https://www.womeninhorrormonth.tumblr.com

60 Black Women in Horror Writing

1

Sixty Black Women in Horror Writing compiled by Sumiko Saulson

February is my favorite month to discover new authors. It is both Black History Month and Women In Horror Month (WiHM). Woohoo, double win! Sumiko Saulson’s unique compilation, 60 Black Women In Horror Writing is celebrates both holidays in grand style.

Some of the women profiled in this book are literary geniuses you’ve read before (Octavia E. Butler, Zora Neale Hurston, and Toni Morrison) but Saulson also introduces us to talented women we’ve never never heard of, too. This book is comprised of interviews, essays, and short stories from the author, herself, and Crystal Connor and Eden Royce. Of the short stories I liked Crystal Connor’s “Amber’s New Friend” the best. I’m a sucker for southern gothic ghost stories, however all of the stories presented are worth a read.

Who Fears Death written by Nnedi Okorafor

 

All 60 women profiled at the beginning of the book are intriguing but I enjoyed Saulson’s seven author interviews most. I’m looking forward to reading Nnedi Okorafor’s “Who Fears Death.” No doubt influenced by two Nigerian (Igbo) parents, Okorafor’s novel combines magical realism and traditional African storytelling with a speculative, post apocalyptic edge. The main character is a shaman, Onyesonwu, whose name means “who fears death” in English. I adore speculative fiction of all stripes, but I especially go weak for marginalized narratives set outside of the West. Women of color are a rare sight in horror and by god we need to see more of them on the shelves! I say that as a woman of color who writes horror and as an unabashed lover of the genre. Neil Gaiman and Stephen King are great but there are other incredible horror sf/f authors out there, too. Let’s uplift them.

I know what cool books I’ll be adding to my To-Be-Read list this year. 60 Black Women in Horror is a welcome addition to any to-be-read list, don’t you think? Tell your friends, share, and please support these horror authors.

Women in horror unite!