Guest Post With The Damsels!

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dwc2

Got a horror project you want to spread the word about? Is it a new film? New book? Or something completely glorious that will drive horror nerds nuts? Let us know! We are open to guest post articles, signal boosts, submission calls, and tips. We want to hear from you. The indie horror community is important to us, Damsels, and without cooperation and support from you our little blog can’t work. Thank you all for continuing to follow us! 🙂

If you’d like to submit an article (be it a review, self-promo, or interview, or whatever!) don’t hesitate to email us at:

damselswithchainsaws@gmail.com OR vicycross@gmail.com

OR send us a request via tweet at @DWCHorror or down below in the comments.

Make sure your guest post relates to the horror genre and is edited and is under 500 words. If we like it we’ll post it. It’s that easy. This is a “for the love” and “honor system” we have going here, guys, okay? So please, no spam or icky stuff.

Cool? Yeah? Good.

The Damsels look forward to hearing from you!

~Damsel Cannibal & Damsel Bruja

60 Black Women in Horror Writing

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Sixty Black Women in Horror Writing compiled by Sumiko Saulson

February is my favorite month to discover new authors. It is both Black History Month and Women In Horror Month (WiHM). Woohoo, double win! Sumiko Saulson’s unique compilation, 60 Black Women In Horror Writing is celebrates both holidays in grand style.

Some of the women profiled in this book are literary geniuses you’ve read before (Octavia E. Butler, Zora Neale Hurston, and Toni Morrison) but Saulson also introduces us to talented women we’ve never never heard of, too. This book is comprised of interviews, essays, and short stories from the author, herself, and Crystal Connor and Eden Royce. Of the short stories I liked Crystal Connor’s “Amber’s New Friend” the best. I’m a sucker for southern gothic ghost stories, however all of the stories presented are worth a read.

Who Fears Death written by Nnedi Okorafor

 

All 60 women profiled at the beginning of the book are intriguing but I enjoyed Saulson’s seven author interviews most. I’m looking forward to reading Nnedi Okorafor’s “Who Fears Death.” No doubt influenced by two Nigerian (Igbo) parents, Okorafor’s novel combines magical realism and traditional African storytelling with a speculative, post apocalyptic edge. The main character is a shaman, Onyesonwu, whose name means “who fears death” in English. I adore speculative fiction of all stripes, but I especially go weak for marginalized narratives set outside of the West. Women of color are a rare sight in horror and by god we need to see more of them on the shelves! I say that as a woman of color who writes horror and as an unabashed lover of the genre. Neil Gaiman and Stephen King are great but there are other incredible horror sf/f authors out there, too. Let’s uplift them.

I know what cool books I’ll be adding to my To-Be-Read list this year. 60 Black Women in Horror is a welcome addition to any to-be-read list, don’t you think? Tell your friends, share, and please support these horror authors.

Women in horror unite!

 

Live interview today–hope you’ll join!

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COVER ART Tuesday Apocalypse

Hello, minions! Please join my live interview on Twitter 6:30-7:00pm EST by following the hashtag: #WritersKaboodle. I’ll talk about my novel, Tuesday Apocalypse, and answer all your burning questions about the writing process and my zany sources of inspiration. Expect snorts, sarcasm, and obligatory tentacle pics. Probably NSFW. See you there! 😀