Let’s Raise Funds for a Horror Movie!

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So I stumble on this and thought….why not talk about it. Jennifer Nangle is looking for some funding for a horror movie she wants to make based on a true story. According to the indiegogo website, she grew up in a haunted house and thought that it would make a great film. The video above talks more about it. Her goal is to reach $2,500 for make-up, editing, special effects, etc. so far she’s made it to $1,560. So if you want to donate you better hurry. You’ve got 18 days before donations closes. The website also has a list of rewards you can receive based on the amount you donate. For example, for $25 you’ll get a shout out on twitter and facebook, a special thank you, a secret link to behind the scenes clips, and a credit at the end of the film. I like a good ghost story, so let’s see if we can make this lady’s dream come true.

Social Media:

https://twitter.com/jennifer_nangle

https://twitter.com/demonic_attach

https://www.facebook.com/demonicattachment?fref=nf

Donate Here:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/demonic-attachment#home

La Leyenda de la Llorona (2011)

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This is a kid’s movie. So why am I reviewing it? Because the ghost of Llorona got nothin’ on chupacabras! And I’m always hunting for spooks from other cultures. Damsel Bruja will write more about Llorona and Mexican ghost tales in another post. For now let’s talk about this movie.

Brother and sister, Beto and Kika go trick-or-treating in their village only to find a strange ghostlike woman. The spirit is Llorona, the wailing witch who kidnaps children. She takes Beto and leaves Kika in the forest. Enter Leo San Juan and his paranormal team of investigators. Leo San Juan is a cute character. His snarky sidekicks add comic relief. There’s Teodora, a ghost who mimics Paris Hilton,  Alebrije, a talking dragon, sugar skulls, and a knight. They travel by air balloon and wind up crashing on a haunted puppet island.

Leo San Juan learns that, in life, Llorona was actually a single mother named Yoltzin. When her house caught fire, she tended to the flames, accidentally leaving her children to drift downstream and drown. The loss proved unbearable, filling Yoltzin’s heart with hate. She became the vengeful spirit, Llorona, and captured other children to replace the ones she lost. Those who got in her way were cursed and drained of life.

It’s a decent kid’s movie. The art isn’t offensive, the side characters add comedy, however the movie runs a little long. I liked watching it in the original Spanish language version with English subtitles. I learned a little Spanish in the process, which is always a good thing! I liked the cultural references, too. Damsel Bruja introduced me to the story of Llorona one evening when we were talking about what inspired Guillermo del Toro’s  film, “Mama.” (below)

This short film frightened Guillermo del Toro. So what does that tell you? I’m really happy Damsel Bruja showed me this. It only makes me hungry to find other Mexican horror films!

New Orleans Ghost Tour

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So I went to New Orleans for New Years Eve. It was a magical trip, with gothic cemeteries and cathedrals, public intoxication on Bourbon Street, and eccentric Voodoo shops and boutiques. I had a blast and visited many tourist attractions, which included the New Orleans Ghost Tour. Spoiler alert: I did not see any ghosts. But I did see the infamous Lalaurie Manson where Delphine LaLaurie slaughtered and tortured dozens of African slaves.

Those who watch American Horror Story are well-familiar with the Delphine’s historical bloodlust. When I stood outside that house I felt a terrible shiver. I wanted to get away from it as fast as I could. I didn’t feel an evil presence or anything like that, but as our tour guide spouted off all the gruesome events that happened there, I got more and more creeped out! The Lalaurie Mansion was the scariest part of the tour. I also visited the oldest and most haunted bar in America, Lafitte’s Bar. I heartily recommend the Hurricane: a pleasant cocktail made with fruit juice and rum. Very tasty! I got to sip on that while I walked through the French Quarter.

New Orleans is supposed to be a hot spot for vampires, ghosts, Voodoo, and other paranormal activity. I didn’t see any of that–but I think I did meet a white man who wanted to mug me! I knew he meant me harm, and yet I was very much attracted to his lazy, Louisiana drawl and the predatory glint in his eye. He said as we walked by, “Hey, can I have that bag?” But I knew he meant it, and had I  been alone, he would have tried to take it. He might’ve been a vampire, I don’t know, haha! Anyway, I was disappointed by the weak selection of “magical items” in the Voodoo shops. Most of it just looked like fare for tourists, however I did buy a figure of St. Teresa de Avila. Mostly because she’s an important element in my novel. At any rate, the ghost tour was fun and I would recommend everyone try it at least once. Who knows…you might just snap a photo of a ghost!