Red Road returns tomorrow on Sundance!

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The Red Road returns for its second season on Sundance channel Thursday, April 2nd 10/9C

This is a heart pounding, nonstop action kinda series and not just cuz Jason Momoa is in it (although that helps, too, ha, ::blush::) I didn’t know what to expect going into the first season and I’m so happy I sat down and actually watched it. Red Road combines everything I want to see more of on TV (not just Jason Momoa ::blush::) like Native American issues and more people of color with prominent roles (Hello! FINALLY!), slick, suspenseful writing, and real world characters who aren’t just canned stereotypes.

Red Road is gritty, engaging, and keeps you guessing all the way through. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer! The first season was only 6 episodes, so you guys can catch up without much difficulty before season two’s premiere.

Trailer:

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1

In a nutshell, the series is about a Native American criminal and the dangerous game he plays with a white cop who covers the accident of his schizophrenic wife and the Native boy she ran over with her car. It’s a cat-and-mouse murder mystery set on an Indian reservation where the “good” cop has to outsmart the “bad” guy. However what’s good becomes bad, and what seems bad in the beginning, is slowly revealed to be good. You’ve seen it before but not like this, I promise. The predominately Native American cast is a refreshing change of pace. If you like psychological cop stories with a lot of twists and turns, then Red Road is for you.

I’ll be tuning in tomorrow to watch season 2! Will you?

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Stewart Granger in “Blanche Fury”

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Don’t you just love these old timey, black-n-white flicks? The breathlessness. The melodrama. The lusty screams of terror. Can’t get enough of it. I’m also a sucker for Stewart Granger. That man can cock his brow like a boss. (Not convinced? Behold. The panty-creaming eyebrow raise)

Just got hot in here, didn’t it? 

Marc Allegret directed this British film. Valerie Hobson plays the title roll, Blanche Fury, opposite of Stewart Granger.  The cinematography is modern for its time, which is impressive. The acting is phenomenal and (since the movie is based on a book) the plot sweeps across the screen in epic glory.  “Blanche Fury” is less a horror and more of a crime-drama or gothic romance. It has the same appeal as a Brontë novel; scowling Byronic heroes and strong-willed heroines.

Blanche Fury is the cruel and ambitious woman, who, once employed as a governess at a mansion, quickly makes the moves on the nearest heir so to marry into wealth. She mistakes Philip (Stewart Granger) as the heir, when in fact he is only the heir’s bastard son. Philip admires Blanche’s cunning. He is a disgrace to the family, which is why he is forced to work in the stables without any money. Predictably, Blanche and Philip fall madly in love and carry an affair long after she marries her Sugar Daddy. However, the closer Blanche comes to inheriting the family’s wealth, the more resentful and unhinged Philip becomes. Eventually he goes insane and murders Blanche’s husband and attempts to murder their child.

I liked this movie a lot. And yes, I’ll shamefully admit it was a lot like watching a soap opera, but hey, I dig psychopathic heroes and infanticide. I recommend “Blanche Fury” for fans of moody cinema and classic, black-n-white film. Granger’s insanely hot eyebrow raise bumps the grade to a B+

Crucible of Horror (1970) REVIEW

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Classic British horror at its finest. I must say, I really enjoyed this movie! This cult-classic flick was directed by Viktor Ritelis and stars Michael Gough, Yvonne Mitchell, and Sharon Gurney.  John Hotchkins provides a deliciously eerie score, and the music reminded me very much of the wailing theremin in Dark Shadows. Is the story supernatural or a crime-mystery? Not quite sure. But I won’t spoil the surprise ending by revealing too much, here.

First five minutes: Not much dialogue, moody camera closeups while patriarch, Walter Eastwood, incessantly washes his hands and stares at his blinking cat. All of this would have bored me to tears if not for the odd camera angles and the characters’ stifled movements. Right away the audience feels a sense of veiled oppression, which is fully-realized once Walter’s daughter, Jane,  kisses a business associate and is savagely beaten with a switch. The camera immediately snaps back to Walter washing his hands again. His wife, Edith, listens to disembodied voices in the attic while Jane sobs from her wounds. There isn’t much dialogue and we’re still not sure what’s going on , but the absence of information only adds to the mounting suspense. We learn Walter is as meticulous as he is cruel. He coddles his son, Rupert, while terrorizing his wife and daughter with physical violence. He seems fixated on his daughter (and her sexuality) most of all.

When she receives a letter at breakfast the next morning, Walter snatches it away and tells his family he will go to the family cottage by himself. Once his back is turned, Edith casually suggests that she and Jane should kill him. Only she’s not joking. The mother-daughter kill-team show up at the cottage that night with poison and a loaded rifle.

I’m not going to write what happens next–but, oh, dear! Things for Walter go downhill from there!

It’s easy to see why Crucible of Horror is a cult-classic. The family is horrifying because audience can relate to them. And the twist ending…you will NOT see it coming! It is strange. Open-ended. And leaves unsettling questions in your mind long after the credits have finished. I didn’t expect to like the movie so much, but I will certainly add it to my collection. I recommend this movie for folks who like mysteries, family horror, British actors, and psychological surrealism. I’m giving this movie an A+ for creeping me out!