“Get Out”…The Horror Version of Meet the Parents

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I’ve been looking forward to watching this. I’m not doing a review since I haven’t seen it. Rather I’m just giving my thoughts on the concept of GET OUT.

It’s basically about a black guy meeting his white girlfriend’s parents and seeing the creepy white suburb that she grew up in. While there he learns that other black people who visited this suburb have gone missing and the few black people he’s come across are acting strangely. One in particular giving him the desperate warning to GET OUT!

Jordan Peele, mostly known for comedy, has written and directed this creepfest and I can’t wait to check it out.

I first saw the this trailer on Facebook and thought that this worst case scenario of Meet the Parents was scary as fuck! I then checked out YouTube to see if there were any other trailers or commentary on the subject. It was interesting to see other people’s views.

Personally, I think it’s super creepy not just because of the racial tension that are sure to be flooding the screen but the reaction of the black people who live in the suburb. To me it seemed like they were brainwashed into staying and being the perfect zombie slave. In the trailer, the mother is introduced as a psychologist who uses hypnosis on her patients. So I’m going to guess that the black people that come to this suburb are put under hypnosis and made into zombie slaves.

I think its an interesting way to go about this film because according to Haitian folklore that’s really what a zombie is. Not a flesh eating monster but a poor victim still trapped in slavery even in death. Not sure that Jordan Peele was going that deep but the Haitian zombie is what came to mind when I saw the mother use hypnosis. My mind also went to slavery while watching the trailer. There was a scene, it only lasted a few seconds, where the neighborhood is sitting together outside with these bingo cards and a large portrait of the main character in the front of the group. It felt eerily like a silent auction.

Anyways, those are my thoughts on the trailer. I hope that I’ll catch this movie soon. I know it’s out in theaters but I don’t like going to the movies alone. So I need to find someone to go with me….maybe I’ll ask my sister. She likes horror movies.

Let me know what your thoughts are? Are you going to watch it? Was I close in my assumptions? Was it worth the trip to the theater?

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60 Black Women in Horror Writing

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Sixty Black Women in Horror Writing compiled by Sumiko Saulson

February is my favorite month to discover new authors. It is both Black History Month and Women In Horror Month (WiHM). Woohoo, double win! Sumiko Saulson’s unique compilation, 60 Black Women In Horror Writing is celebrates both holidays in grand style.

Some of the women profiled in this book are literary geniuses you’ve read before (Octavia E. Butler, Zora Neale Hurston, and Toni Morrison) but Saulson also introduces us to talented women we’ve never never heard of, too. This book is comprised of interviews, essays, and short stories from the author, herself, and Crystal Connor and Eden Royce. Of the short stories I liked Crystal Connor’s “Amber’s New Friend” the best. I’m a sucker for southern gothic ghost stories, however all of the stories presented are worth a read.

Who Fears Death written by Nnedi Okorafor

 

All 60 women profiled at the beginning of the book are intriguing but I enjoyed Saulson’s seven author interviews most. I’m looking forward to reading Nnedi Okorafor’s “Who Fears Death.” No doubt influenced by two Nigerian (Igbo) parents, Okorafor’s novel combines magical realism and traditional African storytelling with a speculative, post apocalyptic edge. The main character is a shaman, Onyesonwu, whose name means “who fears death” in English. I adore speculative fiction of all stripes, but I especially go weak for marginalized narratives set outside of the West. Women of color are a rare sight in horror and by god we need to see more of them on the shelves! I say that as a woman of color who writes horror and as an unabashed lover of the genre. Neil Gaiman and Stephen King are great but there are other incredible horror sf/f authors out there, too. Let’s uplift them.

I know what cool books I’ll be adding to my To-Be-Read list this year. 60 Black Women in Horror is a welcome addition to any to-be-read list, don’t you think? Tell your friends, share, and please support these horror authors.

Women in horror unite!