Cannibal Holocaust, Eli Roth, & Riz O

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This iconic scene from the movie, Cannibal Holocaust (1979) was so troubling to Italian authorities, the director, Ruggero Deodato was forced to prove the images were fictitious in court and explain to law enforcement that he hadn’t actually killed anyone.

I’m not reviewing Cannibal Holocaust (1979). That’s been done to death and also I just don’t feel like referencing the faux outrage and calls for censorship of Eli Roth’s upcoming remake, Green Inferno (2015). My review today is about the soundtrack from Ruggero Deodato’s Cannibal Holocaust (1979) composed by the great Riz Ortolani.

But since I’m on the topic of Eli Roth’s new movie, here’s what I’ll say about it for now. When I see it, I’ll compare it against Deodato’s version and write up a gratuitous review for your enjoyment. Trailer below:

Do I think Eli Roth’s movie should be banned? Do I think a movie about white, social justice warriors getting brutally massacred by brown people is offensive? Ha. What do you think? More often in horror movies, brown and black characters are slaughtered without dignity for white entertainment. Our bodies are still first to be jeopardized onscreen and off…so am I supposed to wave torches and pitchforks over fictionalized, reversed-racial horror? You’ll find out when I watch Green Inferno.

But I digress. Let’s listen to the maestro, shall we?

What made Cannibal Holocaust so great was the off-kilter soundtrack. I use “off-kilter” ironically, because in truth, there is nothing off-kilter about it. It’s fucking beautiful. I adore horror movies with a full orchestral score and my absolute favorite composer for that sort of thing is Bernard Herrmann. However Riz Ortalani’s score is a must for any horror movie buff, too. Not only is the soundtrack beautiful, but when combined with scenes from the movie, the result is a strange, horrifying cognitive dissonance. Modern horror filmmakers alert audiences to the horror with music that is meant to frighten us. But Riz doesn’t do that, here. Instead, he uses sweeping violins, folksy guitar, and funkadelic pops of the synthesizer. By listening to the soundtrack alone, you would never know it accompanied such a gory, controversial movie.

There are 10 tracks in all but my favorites are Adultress’s Punishment (the infamous impaling scene) and Savage Rite. If you write horror, I strongly recommend you try listening to the Cannibal Holocaust soundtrack to get you in the right mood.

Have you watched Cannibal Holocaust? Green Inferno will come out September 25, 2015. Place your bets which one will be better. Whadduya think, fam? Should we all be outraged?

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Human Centipede 1, 2, & 3…overkill, much?

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Human Centipede (2009) and Human Centipede 2 (2011)

Director: Tom Six 

Everyone has heard of the Human Centipede franchise by now, right? The third and final Human Centipede movie is expected to come out this year in 2015 and I don’t know WHY. What more story can there possibly be after the first two movies? If you haven’t watched any of the Human Centipede films (which you totally should if you’re in the UK or Australia where it was banned) I hope you’ve at least seen the South Park sketch, right? Right? 

I’m not gonna bore you with a long synopsis. There isn’t much to these movies that can’t be gleaned in the first 15 seconds of viewing the trailers. Madman kidnaps victims, sews victims together ass-to-mouth, something about centipedes, yadda yadda, everybody dies. Should you watch it? Maybe. If only because it was banned internationally for its “obscenity.”

The ass-to-mouth chain gang concept is kind of hilarious on its own, and if the movies didn’t try too hard to be scary and just rolled with its obvious pulp appeal, this franchise could’ve been saved. However both movies fail to impress, which is hella awkward because too many of us are laughing at childish poop jokes to take what little horror there is seriously.

I think I’ll pass on Human Centipede 3, thank you. 5/10 stars for both films.